Hive Garden Newsletter: COMMENT EDITION (YOU CAN WIN HIVE!)🐌 MARCH 3RD 2022🍊👩‍🌾

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Once a month the newsletter runs a little too close to the #gardenjournal wrap up for this little river to want to do it twice, and so instead, we have the pleasure of a COMMENT EDITION of the Garden Journal Newsletter!

This is a chance where you get to write a comment for a chance to win HIVE. The winner gets announced in the NEXT newsletter by @minismallholding (next Wednesday).

All you have to do is comment below (you can write a post and drop the link if you like) to the given prompt.

This month's prompt:

*What was the first garden you remember, and what impact did it have on you?

Alternatively, if you can't recall a first garden, just write about a garden that had most impact on you.

Have fun and get commenting below - and don't forget to comment on other people's remarks, too!



The next Garden Journal challenge will start at the beginning of APRIL - look out for it pinned in the HIVE GARDEN community. Whether you're planting, end of harvest, tidying up your garden or planning new garden projects, you're all welcome to join in to win HIVE. But keep using the #gardenjournal tag and connecting to others who are passionate about their gardens!

If you have anything you'd like to see included in next week's Garden Journal, let @minismallholding or I know!

Part beneficiary for this post goes to authors that might be undervalued or that wow. The rest will go towards helping me increase my delegation for @thegardenhive, the curation account for 'The Hive Garden' community. See you there!

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My first garden was my grandmother's. She had been an actual farmer, born in 1911 to a Black sharecropping family in Collin County, Texas. She felt it was important that her grandchildren learn how to work the soil and learn how to grow food, so we spent a lot of time doing just that.

What I didn't know was that in the front of the house, the neighborhood was descending into the horrors of the crack cocaine epidemic. This was Grandmother's contribution to us needing to have an outdoor life that was sheltered from the foolishness that would destroy the lives of nearly all of my peers. Instead, we grew up growing nasturtiums, geraniums, roses, tomatoes, potatoes, onions, strawberries, blackberries, apples, and even the occasional bell pepper (although the climate is really too cool here for peppers). I learned how to trim hedges and trees and how to dig out invasive plants and weed the soil. This also gave me the beginning of my now life-long love of nature and the outdoors, and started me as a forager, because blackberries can be found all over Northern California, and arbutus strawberry trees, ornamental plums, fig trees, currant bushes, and the occasional peach tree grow on sidewalks and in the parks!

Fast forward all these years; I now have Grandmother's old backyard, and the soil is exhausted of calcium as I found out last year ... but it is nothing that some dry milk, old Tums that Grandmother left behind, and some oatmeal won't fix so I can grow her favorite things: organic tomatoes. "These taste like tomatoes are supposed to taste like!" she said to me when I presented her my first crop as a teenager. It had been hard, all those years in the big city, and with the commodification of food ... but, something that had brought her a living and brought her grandchildren a safe space at last had made full circle ... and the calcium of those old Tums will yet support one more crop of her favorite things.

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It is so unbelievably awesome when things come full circle!!

I've heard that out of date yoghurt is the biz too - not only for calcium but for adding probiotics to the soil generally.

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Good to know! I bought my potatoes that year some time with sour milk, although it was too late to save them, so this makes good sense!

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I also inherited my green thumb from my grandmother! Maybe it skips a generation. How did you know your soil was calcium deficient? Old Tums, eh? I'll have to keep that mind.

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You know your soil is calcium deficient in a few ways:

  1. It will grow dandelions that will out-compete everything else (they have a long taproot that will grow deep down to get what they need, and bring it up)

  2. Every time you try to grow a Solanum member of the family (tomatoes or potatoes) they stop growing, go yellow from the bottom leaves, and then suddenly die. Poor things literally starved to death -- they have high calcium needs!

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Thank you! Based on this, it seems like there is still plenty of calcium in my soil... for now.

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Crack cocaine versus gardening? I know what I'd chose. You know, it strikes me that gardening is so darn hopeful, community minded, meditative and therapeutic, good for gut health etc - it's exactly what the kids need. I wonder how many communities would be different if there were gardens at their centre.

What a wonderful woman your Grandmother was, giving you a love of gardening that would last a lifetime, and that ensured she lived on through your own green thumbs.

Can I ask though, from this ignorant Aussie, what are old Tums?

A beautiful piece of writing that reminded me of my own Nana, who passed on her gardening love to me. I think it might skip a generation though - my son is a city boy who moved to Melbourne at first chance he got. Saying that, his fiance and brother in law are really keen on urban permaculture and he's being forced to bottle tomatoes, fetch garden supplies and dig garden beds in city backyards against his will. One day, I know, he'll be planting tomatoes with the best of us.

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Tums are a calcium-rich chewable antacid ... Grandmother left a lot of them behind ... Dad thought he was going to use them, but then we discovered what was really going on with all our digestions (insufficient veggies, bad food combos) and so didn't need them any more!

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Oh wow there you go!! Here they are Rennies or QuickEze.

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(Edited)

It is so nice to have inherited your grandmother's garden.

Never met mine so I love this idea of it, my grandma was also had a garden but after I was born, nothing was left.

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Consider this ... to SOMEONE, you may someday be the person that leaves the legacy ... don't know if you are into gardening, but, it's just a thought...

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I have a bunch of things I will love to leave behind so this is a great thought, thank you.

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Grandma did keep you guys safe from the invasion of cocaine. And you guys growing up around growing and sprouting plants made all the difference. Today, you have been able to recreate the same lifestyle and your grandchildren will learn from you as you did from grandma. ❤️❤️

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How much innocent wisdom our ancestors keep, in the kindness of the grandmother's cultivation was her natural instinct for the preservation of life and the very rich teaching for her lineage. In spite of the fact that the things around were, with a twisted interest, her sowing gave you nourishment and love for the organic, what a good story. Thank you for sharing

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Beautiful story and you always have such a great way of narrating your stories!
Your grandmother was clearly a wonderful and very wise woman!
There is a whole philosophy behind gardening, it is not just planting seeds. It is also personally growing and creating powerful connections with Mother Earth! Amazing way to protect you and keep you away from the unpleasant parallel reality that took place in front of the house...
And the story closes with a full cycle! Have the most amazing time (and the most amazing tomatoes) in this garden @deeanndmathews!

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This is a great initiative, you are doing amazing 😊

So the first garden I saw was my mother's, she grew bananas, plantains, cassava, vegetables, guavas amongst other things, and my first thought was how stressful and unnecessary it was since we could buy all these things in the market.

Years later and inflation, I totally appreciate what she did because we are still enjoying all she grows.

Also, I have learned how to grow certain things due to that garden.

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That's so true - I mean, why would we garden if it's cheap at the shops? Aside from inflation (good to see your mother is probably saying 'I told you so') did you know soil health makes vegetables taste better and have better nutrition value? So mass grown vegetables often aren't as good for you as what is in your garden! So many reasons to 'grow your own' and I'm glad she passed on a few things to you.

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She really got the opportunity to say I told you so 😆

Also, I didn't that soil health helped a vegetable, interesting to know.

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Oh it does, it's all to do with all the bugs and bacteria. Fertilsers and pesticides from agriculture make the soil literally LIFE less, which affects the nutrients in plants. So this affects our health too!!

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Wow, I am so glad to have learned this today, totally would have never known this.

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Yes, I can relate to the inflation. One of Our garden back than was mistakenly burnt and it was almost harvest time. We were able to survive with the other garden. I wonder how it could have been if it was just one. We didn't want to cultivate more than one garden that year, grateful to my mum for encouraging us to cultivate another one. And afterwards it was a lesson learnt. We always have more than one garden in different places, though sometimes they are not large.

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Oh, that's sad, imagine all the effort put in.

I don't think we can handle more than one garden though, we tried and one was neglected, maybe someday.

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We humans go through a lot. I was so pained about it but what can I do.

Alright dear, since one is serving it's purpose you don't need to over work yourself

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Yeah, I can imagine how it would have hurt.
Oh well, one is okay for now since we aren't much eating from it.

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my first thought was how stressful and unnecessary it was since we could buy all these things in the market.

I recognize this thought cos I had them too. What I didn't realize then was that, gardening takes away the need to use extra funds, rushing to the market, just to buy a bunch of vegetables.

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It really does mehn, eliminates a lot of spending.

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I am telling you from experience. It can get really annoying thinking of adding a bit of vegetables to your food, and realizing, you have none in handy ..... I mean that last minute when your food is telling you, "oh it would be nice to have a little pumpkin or scent leaves sprinkled into this" 😭😭

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I barely eat veggies 😆 so that never happens to me

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I don't mean soup, guy... 😏😂

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I barely eat any veggies ehh, my family does but I am a sweet mouth queen.

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It's okay darling. Wait, does that mean you don't enjoy salads?

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I don't eat salads at all 😆 mostly because I don't like mayonnaise or any topics.

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Wahala 😂😂. So, what if there are no toppings? That boils down to vegetables, and that's off the table ba 😏

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It would be dry na, I don't like eating veggies raw 😆

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I don tire for your matter..... Abeg shift 😂😂😂

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Sorry ma, it's not my fault na.

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Hahaha, live your best life, babe, don't mind me. 🌝

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That is such an honest confession and I am sure that MANY people have thought that! And then, bang, comes the moment that you realize how fundamental and amazing growing your food is!
So great that you learned how to cultivate as well! Your mom is probably quite proud of you now :)

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It is really so important and I wish everyone could have a garden.

I am glad I gained an interest in gardening, it has been amazing.

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Oh yes, the world would have been a better place if everyone had to take care at least of one plant :)

So glad you are enjoying it so much!

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Nice one and thanks for sharing.. but the issue of garden you sad , actually the garden I remembered ever going to is a fruit a fruit garden where a lot of fruit were planted and this makes me able to see different kinds of fruit and the names which they are called and their species. It was a nice one tho and a great experience

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Gardens often inspire us for their beauty, right?

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Yeah they do.. they look amazing in our eyes...

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Never been to an actual fruit garden, my mother has a few planted but I have always wanted to go to a strawberry or blueberry farm, doubt that it is in Nigeria though.

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It's should be in Nigeria but it would be in some special places

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Like where though? And is it free to the public?

The ones I see abroad you can come, pay a fee and you can taste as many as you want.

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I can't really say but I have actually seen it somewhere but can't really remember where exactly..
Of cus you know that's abroad.. Nigeria will surely do pass that..😃

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Well I'll research about it.

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Alright then but I am sure there is in Nigeria

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Okay then, if it's not, I'll come for you.

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🤣🤣🤣🤣😃😃😃 that's only if you can run...

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What a tour 🥺 I am wondering if you could identify those fruits and their respective names today. Can you still do that? 😃

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Yeah I think I should probably if I see the one I know

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What was the first garden you remember, and what impact did it have on you?

Well, I must say, I started my roof top garden to get some fresh flowers for our daily worship to God. Before that, I would go to the market and buy flowers for 10 rupees - begging for some more as he would give max 10 - 15 flowers. I was spending time for that and also some fuel. The time, the money was not worth because I knew the flowers were not fresh. So I decided to plant a few trees on the roof top and then you know the impact - It's just growing non-stop.

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What a truly beautiful reason to start a garden!! I love that it's an integral part of Thai gardens too - to always have fragrant flowers on hand for the Buddha and for spirit offerings.

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That is a gorgeous story! I didn't realise that but it makes sense now!!!! I bet you didn't even realise that you'd end up with other benefits aside from the cost! You can now be grateful for that flower seller.

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This is amazing, I wish I could grow flowers but they barely ever survive because of the climate.

It is so cool that you had a need and quickly found a solution by yourself.

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Nice one. No more will you have to beg for extras because you have them happily growing on your rooftop. Now, you get to have a satisfactory worship, and the Almighty deserves all the praise. ❤️❤️

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Sometimes it is innocent because of the passion one puts into gardening now the exponential growth is rewarding and surprising.

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Oh my Buddha - wine please - that was quite the emotional journey!! 🌿

https://peakd.com/hive-140635/@artemislives/dutch-volkstuin-circa-1967-my-first-garden-memories

CommunityGardenNL2.jpg

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Loved it.. in good Hive fashion, I will say THANKYOU so much for sharing!

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I found out how necessity turns into passion and how dad couldn't understand why you rebel over growing beans and choose to grow trees instead. It was an awesome read. Bless you. ❤️

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My first garden I remember is when I was little, my mum had a small garden filled with vegetables. From the bush clearing to planting and harvesting was so fun. The garden was not big, so it was not so stressful to make long ridges I was not doing much work though as a child maybe it was so much work for my mum. After school we always check the garden and remove weeds. We could water it and apply manure every three days.
The vegetables (pumpkin, waterleaf, eggplant,okro and bell pepper), we even planted maize. It did so well, the greenish color always makes it beautiful.
The best part of it was the harvest period, we always had veggies as our side dish. I could always hum while eating the maize it was delicious.

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I love the thought of you humming whilst eating - my son did the same thing when he was enjoying his food! You made me imagine your mother and her small children in the field and the lovely vivid colours of the maize and vegetables. A gorgeous story, thanks for sharing! Do you have garden yourself?

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Thanks
Yes I do, is planting season here. I will be growing cassava, maize (my favorite), okro and pumpkin leaf just the way I learnt from my mum.

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Gardens are so much work, my mom is currently trying to grow cassava and it is so tiring.

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Yes,is so much work when the garden is large and done without any help.
The last large garden we are now harvesting cassava from, I didn't do it alone believe me I know how it is.
Doing it alone is more stressful.

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Doing alone is way more stressful, I can't even imagine that kind of stress alone.

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Hahaha, I know some people that do it alone in a very small garden though.

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Has to be small because the digging and pulling isn't easy.

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Lol. I love maize too. And I liked how it was always in abundance because mum had them planted. It was in those period that she didn't grow corn and we had so little corn during the ripe season, that I understood the importance of growing your corn. 🥺

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After school we always check the garden and remove weeds.

How much joy in this sentence! You make it sound like a game and I love that you grew up in a way that this was not just an obligation!

we always had veggies as our side dish.

If this isn't true luxury, then what is luxury?
Lovely story!

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My first garden was my grandmother's. I remember being around 5 or 6 years old and planting belenes (which I now understand are impatiens) and gallos in the chicken and swan shaped planters on her front porch. As my grandmother could no longer get down on her knees to reach the soil, she would sit next to me as I pulled out weeds in the backyard, "No not that one!" she would tell me in Spanish. I didn't find pulling out weeds a chore. It was more like an adventure. Although my grandparents only lived a few blocks away, it was like exploring an entirely new world full of different bugs and even strange rocks in the soil (which I now know were pieces of fossil wood known as jet).
My grandpa would put me to plant cucumbers, tomatoes which I didn't like at the time, jalapeños, and of course some cilantro (which still tastes of soap to me) for the guacamole and tacos. Although I didn't like or couldn't eat most of what I helped cultivate, it had a tremendous impact on me! I began to help out in my own garden, learning more and more every year and eventually taking over management of the garden entirely.
A manager I once worked with said, "I never made my kids pull out weeds because I didn't want to scare them away from gardening, and look now! They're still not interested!"
I think that was a mistake. You have to get in there and get your hands dirty! I am very grateful to my grandparents for introducing me to the world of gardening. I miss them.

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Gosh, the similiarities between your story, @deeanndmathews and my own - all grandparent stories - made me tear up a little. How we live on through our grandchildren! It strikes me that they had time to garden with us in our formative years, unlike our parents who were busy working and raising the family, and it was that that enabled them to pass those good memories attached to gardening that meant they - intentionally or not - handed it down to the younger generation before they died.

To be hoonest, I forced Jarrah (my son) to garden, and he vowed if he had a backyard he'd fill it with concrete. Lol. But as he gets older he sees the value - if not for the love of labouring in nature, for the trees that bear fruit for his belly! His fiance loves it so he'll be drawn in eventually!

I miss my Nana too, and am grateful to her. I feel she lives on each year I garden - I feel her presence with me all the time, particularly with the calendulas.

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Sometimes I fear that I'm forgetting my grandma. But you're right, they live on each year in our gardens.
It's up to us to pass down the knowledge now. I hope I do it right when the time comes!

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Yes I think that's really the true meaning of immortality!

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I remember the first time my mother made me work in her garden, I was so frustrated and it was so hot, kept complaining till the end but look at me now, enjoying it.

Also, It's normal to miss your grandparents, thankfully you have gardening as a bond always.

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Pulling out endless weeds on a hot day can feel pretty miserable sometimes, I agree.
Thank you, I will never forget where my gardening roots came from.

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That is good, remembering is always important.

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The bond is and will always be the possibility of developing an affective intelligence, because it is our relationship with ourselves and with everything around us. We always learn. Thank you for sharing, this beautiful family memory

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Getting children to love gardening is the best gift ever. And your grandparents did hand you that gift. I am happy you received it with your whole heart. ❤️

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I still have memories of sitting on the porch and admiring the impatiens I planted and gently touching their seed pods, making them explode!

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That's a lovely memory @proto26. I hope you'll pass some of that to your children too. 🥰

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It sounds like a tale into a magical forest with a wise goddess inducing without intending to induce but planting in you that which you call an adventure. Each of your ancestors did their own, what a great way to connect with nature.... It must be very beautiful in your garden.

The metaphors of the bad ones always have their interpretations, I agree with you in that of "getting your hands dirty".

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I sure think my garden is beautiful! Despite others calling it a "weed garden".

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Oh I so agree @proto26, that IS the mistake. If a child experiences what we think is a chore as an adventure then it often becomes second nature and they will never see it as the chore. It is also important to understand that the fun comes with its challenges. Delicious veggies and beautiful flowers have their weeds that need to be pulled. I love your early childhood memory. So many of us have that with our grandparents. Special

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You have to get in there and get your hands dirty!

Oh yes, you have! Definitely! And I am telling this being totally on the other side. Being brought up in a flat with minimum experience of nature in my everyday life! Maybe that's why I left everything behind and became a farmer out of nowhere at my 30's. My passion for getting my hands dirty was too strong at the end, haha!
I love reading to these happy memories!!!

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I feel for you. I probably would have done the same. Or at least tried to have a massive garden indoors and on the balcony!

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It is amazing how things work to come in balance eventually someday!

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My first garden was my parents and is the place where I was born. It was in Portsmouth, England and, though it wasn't large, it certainly was interesting. My Dad bred goldfish outside in big ponds and I loved to play with my Action Man figures in them. That was back when they had real metal parts and the diver suit was my favourite. In between the pnds, we had vegetables and flowers. Looking back, I can see hw tiny it was but to a young boy, it was huge.

Behind our house were the mudflats of the estuary where we used to play and forage and take our dog for guge walks. Within sight of the garden was a railway bridge where the kids used to gather and the train drivers would unleash a cloud of steam and a long whistle as they drove underneath, covering us kids in steam, soot and fun.

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Naive me never thought about the fact that goldfish could be bred 😆

This was good to learn, I won't like.

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It's a big industry and goldfish can reach many thousands of dollars in alue. Dad just did it as a hobby though.

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That is interesting, my mother use to rear catfish but I didn't really think much about other fishes.

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Wow, a lot of things in the environment to have fun with. When the garden is small it makes it easier and it will be taken good care of. I can only imagine how fun it will be as a kid because you won't have to do much work. Less work more play.

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He liked to play his action man figure with dad's goldfish... What a child.... Lol.

Now, he makes me imagine him in action.... Hehehe.

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I didn't know you were originally from England. You can't escape the industrial there, huh? Trains, boatyards, mines. Definitely has its own beauty. Jamie always tells me about playing in the Thames estuary and around Kent from where he was from.

train drivers would unleash a cloud of steam and a long whistle as they drove underneath, covering us kids in steam, soot and fun.

Goodness, that's literally Jamie's idea of a good time NOW. Hes the guy that goes on ANY steam train 🚂 and hangs out the window and gets soot in his eye 🚂😎

That playful garden space is what hooks us as children I think. Children LOVE gardens, given a chance.

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yeah, a 10 pound pom from the biggest naval port in the country

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Very nice description of your childhood memories, between play and fun is a natural scene that adorns the garden of your parents.

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Nice memories of innocent times :)
I am writing a post about the first garden and, oh my, looking at it from the eyes of the 4 years old me it was huge, a whole adventure park, while in reality it was a small garden at the edge of a city, haha!
Really enjoyed your playful story!

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My first garden, what a memorable proposal, the first one was my mother's garden. In a house in the area of Barlovento in Venezuela, the climate was very warm and there she planted red, white and pink roses in the center of the garden.

She had two cobblestones (stones piled up) on the sides of the roses, there she placed the clothes she washed, it was an ancestral trick to whiten them, taking advantage of the sun, she had tobos of soap in panela and every so often she sprayed that potion to the clothes so that they would be very white, surprising the pupils of the shining and paradisiacal fragrance of clean that thing that evokes the most natural of the natural, it is pine, it is sun, it is sky, it is air. It was indescribable.

That garden was taken care of by my uncle, all around the garden there were bushes that made a picture and the leaves of those bushes I remember that they were green with yellow spots, by the way, most of them, and the others with green spots. In the east of the garden there was a corridor delimited with stones that led to a cocoa plantation that was at the back, wait I just remembered, it was not only cocoa that was in that yard, there were bananas, cambures and red pears, delicious fruits with a refreshing acid that only occurred in that area for the convenience of the climate.

Finally, from that courtyard there was a beautiful tree and you know what? It was there where the people gathered during the main week of the year to burn Judas Iscariot, it was one of the largest trees in town, emblematic and that is why the custom of worshiping religion that mounts us to punish betrayal.
This was an amazing garden, with roses, stones, lots of grass and shrubs, she always took care of it and watered it, it was part of her life, it was very natural to find roses wherever she went and take them with her to show off their splendor in that sacred temple, built by her love for plants.

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Sounds like a wonderful garden. You had already won me and then you said "cocoa plantation"! COCOA??? I love it (ok, maybe I am a bit addicted to it, haha!). It made the whole picture dreamy! How I wish I could have my own plants (they need humidity and we live in a dry place though)!

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Oh this could be one whole post @riverflows - except I have NO photos (or sound effects)

My first memory is of my grandfather and his garden. We would visit him during the holidays. He had one of those magnificent old homes with an equally magnificent garden. It was beautifully manicured. He had rolling lawns. Perfect. Gardens overflowing with every imaginable colour and variety of flower and huge trees. No. Not huge. GINORMOUS! Us kids would play for hours in the garden. Only now do I realize how much time and hard work he put into keeping that garden so perfectly manicured! He had rhubarb - which I have never been able to grow - and would make the best stewed rhubarb with cream or ice-cream. Or both. In their season he had a lovely grape arbour that we would play under, while we picked bunches and bunches of katorba grapes. My favourite time of the day in my Grandpa's garden was 11 o'clock every morning. He would make us rooibos and he would have black coffee. Then we would sit under the vine on his little verandah nibbling ginger cookies (and stealing his treacle sugar). While Grandpa whistled for the wild birds. He had a particular whistle just for them. And they would come at 11am sharp twittering in response as they pecked at the food he put out for them. Special memory. Remember @craigcryptoking?

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(Edited)

Wow no wonder you two ended up gardeners yourselves! What joyful memories. He sounds like a real character! What a shame there are no photos! You evoke this memory so colourfully I'm sure it's a photograph in your heart and mind. Love this. Thanks for sharing x

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Isn't it amazing how many of us were inspired by grandparents? My brother and I are without excuse considering our mother is the original lady with green fingers and dirty finger nails. But it was so much part of our life looking back I always remember Grandpa as being the inspiration

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Many things are explained now :) The passion for gardening and those amazing recipes and the love for the wild life!
So lucky to have such a wonderful Grandpa @buckaroobaby!
I don't have any photos with me, they are all in my parent's house and I was struggling to find a way to describe the garden of my grandparents! You gave the feeling in a beautiful way! I wish I had memories like yours from my childhood! Absolutely wonderful!!! Thank you so much for sharing!

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Oh I'm sorry that you don't have similar memories @traisto! They really are so precious. As well as forming a child to the adult they become

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Well, I did my revolution and came as close to nature as I could :)
But it was great reading at your story @buckaroobaby, precious memories indeed!

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My first garden was in 1977 in our little rented house on the foot of Mt. Sugarloaf. It was mainly flowers, but I don't remember what.

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I’ve always been more than a little odd; strange you know? (If you say weird, I’ll forgive you, since I know you mean “nice-weird”).

So, on one bright African day, long, long, looooonggg….ago, a wondrous idea popped into my kiddie-head, I was about eight-years-old at the time and I decided to build a magnificent science fiction inspired city in my backyard. At the time, my parents were renovating our house and I “stole” an old door for the purpose. Oh, the memory of those imaginings! I was utterly possessed, running about repurposing various household items, such as wine glasses, and turning them into domed spaceships and bulbous, translucent “skyscrapers”.

I worked really hard on the project too (for a kid that is) and badgered everyone in my family, senseless, for “gifts” that I could mold to my fantasy. I used mason jars, trimmed edges of feather dusters (sprayed silver of course), slivers of mirrors, shiny pebbles, cardboard cereal boxes (and any other type), mounds of paper-mâché and even some cement that the friendly workmen, working on our house helped me spread onto my “door” (which I’d set out on a pair of trellises). Sublime, fun!

I had glorious rivers (with real water, promise) running (not really) over blue painted “pools”. Relatively sturdy fantastical buildings that only a child could fashion, several stick-and-wire men/women/children (I have no idea why, but no kid-SicFi city would be complete without them, right?”).

…and I thought I’d done an excellent job and invited my family to the inauguration “ball”, for which I’d laid out cookies and lemonade (promise).

Everyone oohed and aahed and treated me like the utterly spoiled brat that I was.

But, then…

My grandfather, who is still my best-ever-person-in-the-universe (even though he's long departed), said.
“Where are the flowers, where are the trees, my girl. Where?”

…and that’s how it began - my mystical, magical, initiation into the world of green.

I spent hours, days, really, “landscaping” my door, and planting a variety of seeds and cuttings all over the damn place. It was mud-streaking joy, I’ll tell you that.

But, when the first tiny, fragile leaves began poking their noses out of that soil, true wonder took root, the exhilarating excitement of true love…of a purpose found.

…and I’ve been in a fantastically rewarding, amazing relationship ever since. (Drippy love story, I know, but it’s true, cross my heart).

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“Where are the flowers, where are the trees, my girl. Where?”

Wow!!! That was a strong grounding and an AMAZING initiation!
I mean, wow!!!!!! No wonder why you love your grandfather so much!

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Best drippy love story ever! What an amazing story. You've always been wildly creative, it seems!

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Create wildly, but it’s not the same thing. 😊❤️🤔

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